We have updated our cookie policy to reflect recent changes in the UK/EU law concerning the use of cookies and tracking technologies. We use cookies on this website (including the page you are currently viewing) to ensure that the site functions smoothly and to help us understand how we can improve it. If you continue without changing your settings, you are agreeing to receive all cookies from the SLA website.

or view our cookie policy to find out more

Show Menu | Show Sidebar (Login/Search)

SLA Blog » August 2018RSS Feed RSS

The SLA blog contains news about the SLA and topical information of general interest to our members. The blog has been running since 2004. An RSS 2.0 feed and information about how to subscribe to the blog are available.

Older blog posts are still available, though archived, on the website, but please check the date at the top of the post to make sure the offer or information is likely to be valid.

No new resources for Northern Ireland

You may have recently seen news about #wedeservebetter – a grassroots campaign for the people of Northern Ireland which is calling for the two largest parties in Northern Ireland to resume talks and reinstate a government. The Northern Ireland Assembly collapsed in January 2017, and since then there has been no acting government in the region. The news report I watched focused on the big multi million pound projects that are currently on hold, but the smaller impacts are adding up and causing long term damage.

In Northern Ireland school libraries are under the remit of the Education Authority; school library resource funding has effectively ceased due to the absence of the decision-making assembly at Stormont. This means 18 months without any new resources bought for those pupils; 18 months with reduced or no professional development for the staff, 18 months in which staff are being forced to run a substandard school library service.

This is not acceptable given that research from the Robert Gordon University found that school libraries contributed to:

  • Higher test or exam scores equating to academic attainment: this includes academic attainment in the form of higher standardised test scores in reading, language arts, history and maths, and better grades in curriculum assignments or exams

  • Successful curriculum or learning outcomes, including information literacy: this includes higher quality project work, the development and practice of information literacy, increased knowledge and reading development

  • Positive attitudes towards learning: including increased motivation, improved attitude towards learning tasks, self-esteem, and wider reading for pleasure.

 

Additionally, a Literature Review by the National Literacy Trust in 2017 found that “While traditionally evaluations of library services have focused on outputs rather than service outcomes, a considerable body of evidence shows that schools have an impact on pupils: 

  • School libraries have been found to impact pupils’ general academic attainment, reading and writing skills, plus wider learning skills, as well as their scores in history, mathematics and science. 

  • School libraries have also been found to have an impact on pupils’ reading enjoyment, reading behaviour and attitudes towards reading. Motivation and attitudes in particular have been connected to school library use. 

  • Several personal and interpersonal outcomes, such as self-esteem and the feeling of success and accomplishment, have also been associated with school library use.”

The lack of current resources in schools will hamper children’s reading and consequently their attainment, and is compounded by the lack of funding to other publicly funded organisations, whether that’s different arms of government or charities who would have bid for funding.

The repercussions of this will be felt long after a government is actually re-formed. All stakeholders who can directly contribute to school library resource provision should consider the educational requirements of children and adequately fund school libraries in Northern Ireland.

Impact of school libraries on learning: A critical review of published evidence to inform the Scottish education community.Professor Dorothy Williams, Caroline Wavell and Katie Morrison Robert Gordon University Institute for Management, Governance & Society (IMaGeS) October 2013 https://scottishlibraries.org/media/1211/impact-of-school-libraries-on-learning-2013.pdf

  1. School Libraries: A literature review of current provision and evidence of impact by Anne Teravainen and Christina Clark (2017). (https://literacytrust.org.uk/research-services/research-reports/school-libraries-literature-review-current-provision-and-evidence-impact-2017/)

0 comments · Add a comment

Authors and school library staff - how we can help each other

This blog has been written by Dawn Finch as part of the Development and Discussion blog - posts which deliver an element of CPD. Discuss on the discussion forum or on Twitter - don't forget to use '[at]uksla'. 

Authors and school library staff - how we can help each other*

*and anyone else who buys books or organises author/illustrator visits!

There has been a lot in the press recently about how writers and illustrators are struggling, and recent figures suggest they earn as little as £10,000 a year. The Society of Authors’ Children’s Writers and Illustrators committee have been at the spearhead of an ongoing campaign to support fair dealing for children’s authors, and many creatives have written extensively on the subject.

In his blog for the Society of Authors, top author and illustrator, James Mayhew, details just how little authors get from the sales of heavily discounted books. You can read his article here.

https://www.societyofauthors.org/News/Blogs/James-Mayhew/November-2016/James-Mayhew-Fair-Trade-for-Authors

In it he explains that if you buy a book on a £1 deal, it is likely that the author is getting less than 3p of that. This means that the author would actually earn more from each loan at a public library than from a sale. In fact, even a full priced book only earns the author around 40p from a £7.99 book.

So, where does this leave us? Library staff love authors and illustrators, and the last thing we want to do is support an industry that cuts them out. All book loving educators want bookshelves full of diverse, original, rewarding and challenging books, and we need authors! If they all give up because they can’t afford to continue, the only books we’ll have available to us are celeb authors and those put out by corporations like Disney. We need choice!

However, budgets are rapidly diminishing, and buying all our books at full cover price is simply beyond us, so what can we do? We all talk about fair trade, and are prepared to pay more for a fair deal for all sorts of products. We need to think this way about books too.

There is no doubt that book bundles from those massive discounters are tempting, but remember how little the author gets back from them. Here are a few tips on how to use those discounters and still help authors, and hopefully stretch your budget guilt free!

  • Avoid using them to buy the author’s most recent title. If you see the book on there, and you know it’s the most recent one, please don’t buy it. Many future writing deals for authors depend on early sales of a new title, and heavily discounted copies are often not counted at all. These are not remaindered or end-of-line books, these are editions printed especially for the company as part of what’s known as a “special deal”, and sales of them won’t be counted as overall sales of the book, and the author will get a very tiny amount back per book.

  • If you see a book heavily discounted, or packaged in a bundle, try contacting the author and ask if they have approved the deal. You can find many of them on social media, or try contacting the Society of Authors to send a message to them.

  • Only use heavy discounters for buying bundles or cheap books from really big-name authors, or dead ones. That sounds harsh, but I doubt Roald Dahl cares if you buy ten books for a tenner, and these cheap bundles can replace the hardest working standards on your shelves. I also think JK can afford it, don’t you?

  • Wherever possible, buy the book from an independent bookseller, or from the author or publisher direct. Buying direct from the publisher or author is unlikely to add to their Nielsen sales figures (and so add to the count in the bestselling lists), but it might sometimes be a better way of getting money directly into the pocket of the author. The best bet is always going to be to ask the author and/or publisher which method of sales suits them best, and to go with that. If you can organise sales of their books in advance, you can be sure of working out the fairest way for the author to reimbursed, and to ensure that pupils have a copy of the book before the event.

  • It is unlikely that you will see small or independent publishers featured in these discount catalogues, and that will limit your choices. It’s well worth following some of the smaller independent publishers and small presses on social media and buying direct from them.

  • If you can use independent booksellers and reps for your non-fiction, you will definitely get a wider choice. Most mainstream non-fiction authors will probably have been paid a set fee for the work, and so sales will not earn them any more money. That means you can safely go for discounts on those, but you might want to check with the author if it’s a big and lavishly illustrated title. Not all non-fiction books are published after a set fee. However, once again remember that doesn’t count for newest titles. That non-fiction author still  wants a contract for the next deal and if sales are invisible thanks to those “special sales” deals it is harder to prove your writing stands out.

We’ve covered buying direct, and fair trade for authors, but what else can you do to support them?

It is undeniable that an author visit supports the reading for pleasure agenda in your schools, and I’ve never met a member of library staff who needed convincing of this. Sadly, I have met far too many business managers and head teachers who still remain unconvinced, and who question the expense. Let’s break down a few figures on this to give you some ammunition to convince the people who hold the purse-strings in your school.

The Society of Authors has guidelines for the fees for an author visit, and these are around £500 a day. Lots of people might feel that this is a lot of money, but let’s take a closer look at that. For a start, you might only see the author for that one day, but what you are actually seeing in that day is work that might have taken weeks to prepare. The resources and materials that an author uses in a visit might have cost them hundreds of pounds, and would need updating and replacing on a regular basis. The visit that appears to come down to a few hours, is actually the end result of ten times that, and many years of hard work and rehearsal.

We need to stop thinking of author visits as just an opportunity to flog a book (although I’ll come to that in a bit!) and start thinking of it as a select performance event. If we stop thinking about the money as a per-hour price, and start thinking of it as a per-child price, things look very different. The average price of a child’s cinema ticket is £6. It costs around £7 to go ice skating or bowling. £15 for the zoo, or for a panto, and to see a favourite band it could cost anywhere between £10 and £100! The average cost of an author visit in a secondary school works out around £2 - £3 each, and often much less. That’s a few pounds per head to inspire an entire year group and raise reading levels. With well-planned follow up projects, and linked schemes of work, it starts to look even better value. You could get a whole half-term literacy and literature focus for just a couple of quid per pupil? Amazing! Anyone who has ever seen the author visit buzz first-hand should now see that £500 as a bargain. Try pitching it to your Head, per head (no pun intended).

Promotional materials support author visits, and encourage readers, but they are expensive. Most people don’t realise that authors actually pay for this stuff themselves. It might not seem like a big ask when we pitch out to authors for bookmarks and posters, but every pack of these is money from an author’s pocket. If you are on the hunt for promotional materials for your library, the first thing to do is contact the publisher direct. I find that asking them in a public way (i.e on social media) can often prompt them to be a bit more generous. It is also worth making friends with any bookshops in your area as they will be chucking out their poster when a new promotion rolls onto the shelves. If you want to make your own bookmarks and posters, don’t forget to ask permission from the author or illustrator before you use their images

One other thing worth mentioning – book sales. If you can possibly do this in advance, and directly with the author or the publisher, that is the best way. This way the author will get a fair deal on the sales. If you can't either sell the books while they sign or ask another member of staff to help out (sometimes if you do a bulk order through a bookseller they will send a member of staff as well). There are few things that can ruin an author’s day more than sitting with a cash tin and hoping that kids will line up to buy your books.

If you can’t do advance sales, make sure that everyone in the school knows the author is coming, and when they are coming. Put up posters all over the school, including in the staff room, and make sure reception know too. Send letters and order forms to everyone (parents, carers, primary schools if relevant) - and don’t forget to let all staff know that they too can order signed copies as gifts, or to keep for themselves! Sell as many copies as you can, and you not only help an author’s income, but their self-esteem too. It also means that any follow-up work you do can be supported by the pupil having their own copy of the book. Ownership is such an important part in reading for pleasure (see link below). Owning a signed book, when they’ve met the author and engaged with them in the real world is beyond inspiring and can genuinely be life-changing. Almost every author I’ve ever met can tell you about the first time they met a “real” author, and that’s not a coincidence. Talk to your SLT and see if its possible to use some money from the pupil premium fund to buy books for that cohort – it is vital they get the chance to buy books as well. Measure the impact through the number of children who take up the offer, and whether they start/finish the book. It might not have immediate impact, but it helps them realise reading is a cultural thing they do have access to.

If you can do all you can to turn that mingling line of kids, into a row of happy faces clutching books, you’ll make authors very happy indeed. We love signing books, do us a favour, and make our day!

Treat your authors well, and pay a fair rate for their work both in person and in print, and we’ll all get the very best we can out of the partnership.

Dawn Finch is a children’s author and former school librarian. She is a CILIP Trustee and former President, and a member of the Society of Authors’ Children’s Writers and Illustrators Committee. She writes both fiction and non-fiction for children, and can be contacted via www.dawnfinch.com or on twitter [at]dawnafinch

0 comments · Add a comment

Job Vacancies at School Library Association: Member Development Librarian at SLA HQ

Don't forget there is still time to apply for the exciting vacancy which has arisen within the SLA. 

The Member Development Librarian will have oversight of Member Services, and be the first port of call for profession based (opposed to membership based) enquiries. This person will enjoy a great degree of autonomy and will take responsibility for managing her/his day-to-day workload.  Main areas of responsibility will be in maintaining and developing services to Association members and looking after the website content. Project management may be required at times.

The Member Development Librarian has to have a flexible approach in assisting with urgent demands and new projects. They will work with the team in the Office to ensure SLA members receive a first class service and a strong and proactive Association.

Base:            SLA office, Swindon

Hours:             37 per week although a part time role of 25 hours or more would be considered (Flexible Working Arrangements available after the probation period)

Salary:        NJC scale 28-29: £25463 - £26470 (FTE)

Holiday:      22 days plus bank holidays

Closing date: Wednesday 29th August. For more information, see the documents below (the person specification is 'Why work at the SLA') or email info[at]sla.org.uk

More Details...

0 comments · Add a comment

Job Vacancies: KLQ Voluntary Regional Organiser: Voluntary Regional Organiser for Plymouth Area

KLQ UK VOLUNTARY REGIONAL ORGANISER SOUGHT FOR THE PLYMOUTH AREA

Looking to develop your CV and develop contact with like minded librarian colleagues across the UK? – Then look no further!

The Chairman and Trustees of the Kids' Lit Quiz UK are looking for a Regional Organiser for the coming year and beyond, for South West England (based in the Plymouth area or near the Devon/Cornish border), to join our happy team of volunteers.

The KLQ UK hold 19 Regional Heats up and down the country which culminates in a grand National Final, normally held in London. The winning UK National team are then invited to enter the World Final the following year, which would take place in one of the other participating countries. Wayne Mills, our Founder and Quizmaster, asks questions on children's literature and it could be anything from the Comics to the Classics. There is no reading list. The Regional Organiser would be responsible for contacting schools to enter teams of four students from Years 6, 7 and 8 to compete for the Regional cup, to collect the entry fees and complete a Returns Form to be sent to the National Treasurer, and to provide a venue (usually a School hall) to hold approx 20 teams and supply light refreshments. All expenses are paid.

A list of Guidelines will be sent on request.

For further details, please contact Jacky Atkinson, Chairman - klquktrustee1[at]gmail.com

More Details...

0 comments · Add a comment

Information Book Award 2018: Children's Choice Vote 2018

 Vote here for the Children's Choice Vote 2018 - https://www.sla.org.uk/vote

All votes count towards deciding which book recieves the Children's Choice Award. There is an Award for each category and an overall winner. 

Voting closes on Saturday 27th October. 

More Details...

0 comments · Add a comment

One world resources

One World Publications have produced more downloadable resources for use with their books - browse the available materials here: https://www.rocktheboat.london/downloadable-resources/

0 comments · Add a comment

LAL-congratulations

Congratulations to Diana P who has recently completed the Learning About Libraries Course from Argentina! She has also recently finished the Cataloguing course and gave us this feedback: "I enjoyed it and our Literacy Coordinator has organised a full primary school staff meeting to take place in the Library - partly as a result of the two CPDs I worked on.  I am hoping to get everyone on board with the tidying up, weeding, cataloguing and classifying of our resources .... as well as having a look at the new books. So I am feeling very happy about it all." 

0 comments · Add a comment

Job Vacancies: ST GEORGE'S SCHOOL COLOGNE - LIBRARIAN

St George’s School seeks an experienced librarian to lead our library team and further develop the library space.

The School
Serving the international community in Cologne for almost 30 years, St George’s School combines an enriching curriculum with family orientated care. The school has grown from small beginnings into a thriving community of over 750 pupils, aged from 2-18 and representing more than 40 nationalities. The National Curriculum is taught throughout the school, and we offer the IB Diploma in our Sixth form. One of a group of four schools located across Germany, St George’s offers the successful applicant an exciting range of opportunities for professional development and growth across the school group
.
The Location

Located on a new, purpose built campus on the outskirts of Cologne, St George’s School enjoys direct transport links to the city centre, as well as to the greater area of Cologne-Bonn. Germany’s fourth largest city, Cologne is a dynamic and vibrant cultural centre, with a large and diverse international community. Situated in the heart of Europe, Cologne offers a high standard of living, as well as numerous opportunities for travel and cultural discovery. Cologne-Bonn airport is located only 20km from the school, with many daily flights to the UK, and a high speed rail service connects Cologne to London, via Brussels.


Please download our application pack below for detailed information about the role.

 

For further details, and to make an application, please visit our website
Only applications made through our on-line system will be considered.  

Closing date: 15th September 2018. The school reserves the right to contact outstanding applicants in advance of this deadline.
St George’s is committed to safeguarding and protecting the welfare of children and expects all staff to share this commitment. The successful applicant will therefore be subject to enhanced background checks.

For any enquires relating to this role, please do not hesitate to contact us directly:

Mr. P. Dickinson
Academic and Recruiting Director.
E-mail: 
recruitment[at]stgeorgesschool.de
Tel: 0049 2233 808870

 

 

 

 

 

More Details...

0 comments · Add a comment

CE Blog 2: Membership Survey

This is the second of the Chief Executive’s blogs – my way of keeping you in the loop with what’s happening at SLA headquarters. This post is going to focus on the recent membership survey we conducted. It opened in April, and we were pleased to have nearly 760 responses.  This blog will be some of the highlights, and hopefully give you some insight into the things we are working on.

Groups

Of the respondents, 90% were members, and 10% weren’t. 45% of respondents were members of CILIP, 23% were not a member of any support group, and 32% were a member of informal networking groups. Other groups most mentioned in addition to the National Literacy trust, CILIP groups and SLS’s were: UK Literacy Association, LIPSEE, Federation of Children’s Book Groups, Independent School Librarians Group, BookTrust and the Reading Agency.

This gives us a clear indication of the groups we need to be working with, and making sure we are maximising any opportunities for additional gain for our members. We are also mindful of those people who are not a member of any groups and the importance of ensuring they have support and opportunities to engage as well.

SLA Services

  • Most used: articles in The School Librarian
  • People were most aware of: the Weekend Course
  • Aware of but don’t use: Phone and email support
  • Least aware of: Board nomination resources

The bottom two are of particular interest, so just to clarify. You can use the phone and email support for anything – from policy queries to when you’re having a bad day and you just need to vent. Someone commented “I am tired, dispirited and need some support – this is a lonely and demanding job at times” and I think most of us can empathise with those comments, but if this is how you are feeling, pick up the phone and call us; you are not alone.

The lack of awareness of the board nomination resources is partly because a smaller percentage of membership will be interested in applying to become a Board member, but we need to ensure that members get the choice from as wide a pool as possible. Maximising awareness of these resources and of board members is something we need to bear in mind when we next come to advertise board vacancies. We will try and advertise them much more widely and make the expectations and support much clearer.

We also received a lot of feedback about the website, and the lack of branches in some areas. Both of these are things we are currently working on – the new website will (hopefully) be launched by the end of 2018, and we are currently having discussions in the office and trying to come up with plans for how we can best support those in areas without a branch. We are hopeful the new website may be able to help with this as well. Some suggestions of things respondents wanted from the new website included: a member directory, more online courses and making the resources easier to navigate – all of which are things we are discussing in-house.

 Lots of people mentioned also wanting mentoring/coaching, advocacy, more regional training and more working in partnership was a trend as well. Being new in post I have had a lot of people to meet, and this has been quite beneficial for me, as I begin to understand organisations from a different perspective. I am keen on working with different organisations for the benefit of our members – and I will let you know about any developments as soon as I can. More regional training is something we are also conscious of and will be working on developing once we have a full complement of staff in place. The mentoring service is fab, and can work really well, and we will be doing a review of this next year to see whether we can iron out making sure it’s working well for everyone involved. In terms of advocacy we are working away, both on the Great School Libraries campaign and on advocating on our own behalf. Recently we have sent letters to various All Party Parliamentary Groups highlighting the impact that school libraries can have on outcomes, and we are negotiating hard to get as much exposure directly to schools as possible.

57% of respondents either aren’t or didn’t know if they were signed up to the e-newsletter. If you don’t know, it’s an email that draws your attention to recent posts on the website, bringing the latest SLA news to you directly. If you want to sign up you can do that here: https://www.sla.org.uk/e-mail-newsletter.php though you do need to be a member, and signed in.

62% of respondents said they weren’t aware of the extra benefits of SLA membership, or didn’t know if they knew about them. This is the information on this page of the website: https://www.sla.org.uk/what-is-in-it-for-me.php and there will be a round up in the next info@ of the partnership offers so you can make sure you are using your membership to its full potential. These are things I will continue to work on, and we will announce them on the website and in info@ when they can be released.

Book and Digital reviews:

51% of respondents wanted more reviews, while 49% said they didn’t, but this combines with only 25% being aware of the additional reviews on the website, and 75% saying they’re not aware of them (they are available here: https://www.sla.org.uk/tsl-reviews.php listed in with the reviews which were in the journal).

Branches

Branches were predominantly wanted for networking, training and general support – and I would like to thank all our Branch committees who put so much time and effort into ensuring that things run in their locality. 91% of respondents said their school would let them out for training, but judging by the comments section, rarely is this as simple as it sounds with lots of additional cover, bargaining etc happening.

In terms of the best time of day 61% of respondents said during the school days was best for training, while 23% said a Saturday, and a fairly even split across morning, afternoon and twilight sessions (10%, 11% and 18% respectively). When it came to whether a full day or half day was best this was split as well, with 51% preferring a full day, and 49% preferring half days.

Publications

62% of respondents found SLA publications extremely or very useful, with 34% finding them somewhat useful. We will continue to produce high quality publications, and we will consider your requests seriously – some of which were: impact, boys’ reading, copyright, Fake News, displays and KS4/Sixth form. If we can’t do a publication on a topic, or it will take a significant amount of time I will try and make sure that need is met in a different way – through a blog post or resource for example.

In terms of the topics of interest we suggested, 88% of respondents said they would find educational research either useful or maybe useful, 79% said that about library design, and 69% said that about international school librarianship, so we will look to find ways of feeding those needs. There were also a significant number of comments about e-resources and evaluation, so I will feed that into training/publication discussions also.

General

I was pleased that all the awards got a good reception from respondents with someone commenting: “Morale boosters and awareness creators. Good!” which sums up why the awards are important very succinctly. I think it’s worth highlighting that the awards are run using only sponsorship, so no membership money is used for them. They are vital for advocacy as we need to be showing the powers that be what libraries and library staff could be achieving if certain barriers were removed.

Other comments included requests for more technology, more advanced courses and publications and for Board and award winners to be available to go to branches. And again, we will feed this in to discussions. One trend that I have noticed is that respondents weren’t aware of things we are already doing, or services we already provide, so I think there is a need for us to review our internal publicity (ie how we increase member awareness) and make sure people know what their membership offers, while balancing that with the need to not overwhelm members with emails and notices.

Finally, a massive 97% said they would recommend the SLA to someone else, which is a hugely positive thing, and something that inspires the office to keep working as hard as we do. Thank you to everyone who took part and for all the comments, whether it’s saying how much you value your membership or a point for us to improve on. They all help energise us and we will do our best to respond to you over the next few years. Don't forget you can continue the discussion using the #CEBlog and @uksla. 

 

0 comments · Add a comment

Job Vacancies:

St George’s School seeks an experienced librarian to lead our library team and further develop the library space.

The School
Serving the international community in Cologne for almost 30 years, St George’s School combines an enriching curriculum with family orientated care. The school has grown from small beginnings into a thriving community of over 750 pupils, aged from 2-18 and representing more than 40 nationalities. The National Curriculum is taught throughout the school, and we offer the IB Diploma in our Sixth form. One of a group of four schools located across Germany, St George’s offers the successful applicant an exciting range of opportunities for professional development and growth across the school group
.
The Location

Located on a new, purpose built campus on the outskirts of Cologne, St George’s School enjoys direct transport links to the city centre, as well as to the greater area of Cologne-Bonn. Germany’s fourth largest city, Cologne is a dynamic and vibrant cultural centre, with a large and diverse international community. Situated in the heart of Europe, Cologne offers a high standard of living, as well as numerous opportunities for travel and cultural discovery. Cologne-Bonn airport is located only 20km from the school, with many daily flights to the UK, and a high speed rail service connects Cologne to London, via Brussels.

Please download our application pack below for detailed information about the role.

For further details, and to make an application, please visit our website
Only applications made through our on-line system will be considered.
Applications should be submitted by the 
closing date of 9th March 2018. The school reserves the right to contact outstanding applicants in advance of this deadline.
St George’s is committed to safeguarding and protecting the welfare of children and expects all staff to share this commitment. The successful applicant will therefore be subject to enhanced background checks.

 

 

For any enquires relating to this role, please do not hesitate to contact us directly:

Mr. P. Dickinson
Academic and Recruiting Director.
E-mail: 
recruitment[at]stgeorgesschool.de
Tel: 0049 2233 808870

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

More Details...

0 comments · Add a comment

International Dot Day!

 Celebrate 10 years of International Dot Day on 15th-ish September!

It all started TEN years ago, when a teacher and his students in Iowa celebrated the themes of creativity and courage in Peter H. Reynolds’s The Dot. Now, every 15-ish September, more than 10 million teachers, librarians, and children in 170 countries participate in International Dot Day, making their mark by getting busy with writing, drawing, painting, or other creative outlets and sharing their Dot Day inspiration with others.

Join in the global celebrations on 15-ish September by hosting a reading of The Dot, throwing a creative dot-making event, or planning a weeklong series of activities — the possibilities are endless! To get started, download the free International Dot Day pack from Walker Books packed with simple ideas to help you celebrate creativity in your classroom or library, and you can also download a free International Dot Day event poster.

We can’t wait to hear about your International Dot Day event in your classroom or library. Keep us updated by sharing any news, photos and art with us via Twitter @uksla @WalkerBooksUK #DotDay, #Makeyourmark.

International Dot Day Classroom Guide          

Make Your Mark Event Poster

PDF file, 573 kB

Requires Adobe Reader

 

PDF file, 2 MB

Requires Adobe Reader

 

To find out more and to discover other great ideas for making your mark on International Dot Day, visithttp://www.thedotclub.org/dotday/

0 comments · Add a comment

Congratulations YeEun!

We would like to congratulate YeEun Lee on successfully completing our online Learning About Libraries course. YeEun commented that she was very excited about her success and that the course has helped her a lot - we're very glad to hear it!!

0 comments · Add a comment